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Up Topic Training / Trail and Ultra Running / Cascade Crest 100 2008 version
- - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-26 3:59 PM
Cascade Crest 100 mile run 2008

CCC100 was the culmination of a very good year of running for me.  My plan from the year consisted of a series of race goals each meant to improve an aspect of my running. 

Goal 1 was a 24 hour timed run back in March.  I used the training for this race to build up my mileage base. I ended up with 112 miles and a third place finish. :happy: Goal 2 was a pr effort marathon at the beginning of summer to build up my speed and maintain my base.  I Pr'd by 7+ minutes. :happy: And goal 3 was to take this base mileage and speed then add on some really long trail runs with lots of elevation gain so that I could run a 100 mile mountain race near the top end of my potential.:wtf:   It might sound like a well thought out plan but I really had no idea what I was doing. 

I almost screwed up because I ran a 50 mile mountain race a month ago then followed that race with a super hard high mileage week.  I probably should have taken a rest week instead.  Several weeks into taper I was doing some stride outs and something gave out in my right knee. :cry: I figured I weakened something with the hard race-high mileage week combo.  This was like 4 days before my race so I went into an intensive RICE therapy and was very skeptical that I would be able to finish the race.:sad:

During my taper I abstained from caffeine so to give myself an extra boost when I needed it during the race.  I also did a few weeks of heat training in the sauna.

As usual my wife:hug: and I loaded up our travel trailer with supplies and headed to the race area on Friday before the race.  I like pulling in early and taking a nice easy day just hanging around playing with the dogs or play card games with my wife or even watching a movie in the trailer.  I usually end up getting a good night sleep this way too.

Race morning I was well rested and joined 107 runners for breakfast and a briefing.  My wife was having fun talking to many different people and petting all the dogs that were running around loose picking up breakfast scraps.  I kind of just found a place to relax and concentrate on what I was about to do.:cool:

Cascade Crest 100 is as the name implies 100 miles of running, walking, scampering, splashing, climbing and sometimes falling through some beautiful country in the Cascade Mountains east of Seattle Washington.  The race starts at 10 a.m. which seems kind of late to me but I guess they want everyone to experience some of the more technical parts of the trail during the dark hours.
The website says there are 20000 + feet of elevation gain and about 75% single track.

Key features of the race include:

3300' climb up to Goat Peak and Blowout Mt. in the first 8 miles.  This is followed by 30 miles of  Pacific Crest trail with plenty of minor to major climbs and drops.:shocker!:

A very steep bushwhack like drop with the aid of ropes down to a rails to trails which takes you through a 2.3 mile dark wet tunnel.:shocker!:

Another monster 2000' climb up forest roads to Keechelus Ridge followed by a 7 mile  drop back down to Lake Kachess which is the gateway to the famed "trail from hell" section-a 5 mile section of gruesome trail that takes every body forever to finish if they finish at all.  This section has all the features that put the word technical in some trails including steep cliff like drops into some dark abyss, old growth 5' diameter trees lying across the trail with no way around, mud, water, disappearing sections etc....:shocker!:

A 3000' climb up to Thorpe mountain which would be so bad except that this climb is punctuated by these agonizingly steep sections that are called "the cardiac needles".  It is nearly impossible to ascend these needles without periodic breaks to get your heart rate back down.:shocker!:

Lastly a beautiful descent down the Silver Creek draw which brings you back into the outskirts of Easton, WA where the race began the day before.:grin:

So at 10 a.m. we took off through several miles of residential dirt road to the trail which took us up to Goat Peak.  I felt very strong on this climb and my knees were only hurting a little.  I was still very skeptical that my knees were going to hold out.  I followed a girl for much of this climb who seemed to like to hit the lesser grades at a slow jog.  We made it to goat peak pretty fast this way.  I forgot to hit my split button on the watch these first few aid stations. 

This day I tried something new.  I used a Nathan 1.5 liter hydration pack.   The pack worked great but with temps nearing 80 I ran out of water a few times so an extra water bottle would have been nice.  The Nathan has some nice pockets in the front and I tried to keep them stuffed with food.  I like to take something down at least every half an hour.  I used mostly gels between aid stations but devoured everything while in the aid stations.

On the way up to Cole Butte I hooked up with an East Coast runner.  This guy was a seriously fast older runner but had no intentions of pushing it to hard today.  He was a bit nervous about getting through some of the night time technical stuff so I told him that if he was in my neighborhood he was welcome to run with me.   As we went on I found that he really liked to talk and talk some more.:roll:  I enjoyed our conversation but for the most part I'm kind of a hermit style runner.:cool:  I run with the most ease and least effort when things are quiet and I'm concentrating on the act of running. :meh:  I figured at some point we'd probably split up anyway because holding the same effort with another runner during a race is very hard.  During some of this early part he did help me push my pace some.

20 miles into the race you hit the PCT section which is some real nice runable trail with quite a few short but difficult climbs.   At this point my legs started to really get sore.  I guessed it was due to the hard uphill effort from before so I hoped I'd recover soon.  As I covered more ground the leg soreness intensified in both legs.  Not too much knee pain as I expected but mostly general stuff and some specific groin muscle soreness.  It kept getting worse and my pace was starting to drop off.:sad:  A few times here my new found partner would slip ahead then I'd meet him at the next aid station.

At 33 miles I limped into Stampede Pass.  I had a short pace chart that showed 24 hour pace at a few key locations which coincided with where my drop bags were located.  I was surprised to see that I was on a 24 hour pace but didn't expect to hold it.  By this time I was pretty discouraged with the soreness in my legs which wasn't going away so I decided to take 400mg of ibuprofen.  I don't like taking pain killers this early in the race because to me it seems to take away the effectiveness of doing this later in the race.  Plus I really don't like taking meds during a run. :mischief::roll: So I decided to take a few extra minutes at this aid station to take my pills and to down a bottle of ensure plus I had some soup and sandwich stuff from the aid provided.  I also took off a shoe for the first and only time during the race to empty out a rock that was bothering me.  Not sure how that rock made it past my gaitors.  :wtf:

As I was leaving the aid station I grabbed a turkey and avocado sandwich and told my partner that I'd be heading up the trail at a slow pace waiting for him to catch up.  He was changing some cloths or something.  I never saw him again.

As I expected the ibuprofen kicked in along with the big food and ensure from the previous stop.  My pace became strong again and I was moving well.  This really cheered me up plus I was all alone again, which is the way I really wanted it to be, at least for a while.
Parent - - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-26 4:06 PM
The next 15 or 16 miles were seemingly effortless.   I was getting reports at aid stations that I was in the top 25. :grin: During this section you run through one of the most serene sections of the course.  You enter this large valley with creeks and ponds below and a pretty waterfall above.  The air also had the strong smell of smoke.  I climbed the trail to the top of the waterfall to this beautiful "hike in" lake.  The Sun was getting very low on the peaks at this time and there were a few tents set up along the lake.  I'm sure these campers were all set for a nice night of relaxation while singing kumbiya around the campfire but what they got was 100 + runners screaming by. :evil: They were very good sports and cheered me on as I went by.  

I had not seen any other runners for hours but soon came upon a girl and then another dude runner.  The dude was running his first 100 but said he was having eye problems and was happy to have company.  Unfortunately this was about the time I had to take an emergency bio break behind a tree so I let him go.:blush:

At 47 miles I pulled into the Olallie Meadows aid station as it was starting to get dark. This is a great aid station and I had a couple pirogues while I was there.  Unfortunately the mosquitoes were out in force by now so I didn't stay long.  I noticed that all the volunteers were bundle up in jackets and hats.  Wasn't sure if it was cold or the cloths were protection against the bugs.  I was still wearing a short sleeve shirt and felt very comfortable.

Not long after this AS I followed some flagging and made my way off the PCT to the famous rope section.  Unlike 2 years ago this section was cleared, will marked and easy to find.  The descent down the ropes is about as technical as it can get and still be called trail running but it went by quick.  By this time I was using my headlamp.

A short while after the ropes I entered an old railway tunnel under a mountain.  The rails are now gone but the tunnel goes on way further then you can see about 2.3 miles.   I could see another headlamp ahead and pushed to catch up.   I recognize him as a local Seattle runner, named Tony  whom I have seen in many races.    This was a good sign because Tony has run this course many times and usually finishes around 24 hours.  We talked for a while then I pushed ahead.  The tunnel was leaking all over the place from all the rains we have been having recently.  The water vapor became very thick to the point of making it nearly impossible to see with the headlamp being lost in the fog.  I had to work hard to keep the little panic voice down. :shocker!: I found that moving my headlamp to the side I could see the tunnel wall without being blinded by my light in the fog.   Eventually I was relieved to make it out of that cold wet tunnel and back into the beautiful clear night.  Stars never looked so good.:happy:

I ran some pavement, crossed the freeway and made it into the Hyak aid station at about 8:40 which was faster then my 24 hour chart.  Overall I was feeling real good.  I had no blisters but earlier I had kicked a rock and could tell a toenail had lifted. :cry: I decided to leave my feet alone for the time being.  Some of the general soreness of my legs was coming back so I took a few more ibuprofen.  My wife and my dogs:hug: were at this aid station to meet me and help me with whatever I needed.  I didn't really need much.  I put on a long sleeve shirt and grabbed some gloves.  I also had another ensure and some soup.  As much as I wanted to stay I decided to move on.  I gave my wife a kiss and told her to think about a best case scenario and a 24 hour finish even though I really didn't think this was possible.

This next section is a few miles of highway frontage road followed by a long forest road climb up to a ridge.  I was feeling good but something wasn't right with the course.  I vaguely remembered this section from 2 years ago but where were the course markings.  There were supposed to be some glowsticks here to show the way but I was not seeing them and I started to get nervous.:shocker!:  Did I miss the turnoff?:wtf:  This kind of second guessing can really slow you down.  Eventually I turned around to see another headlamp in the distance so I turned around and ran back.   The runner was Tony who I had seen in the tunnel earlier.  This was Tony's 6th running of this race so I was glad to see him.  The lack of course markings made Tony start to second guess too so we were a bit nervous.  An older SUV went by us with some loud mouthed beer drinking kids so I figured they were out collecting glowsticks.  I was seeing little strips of flagging lying on the ground every once in a while which was our only clue as to if we were on course.  We finally came to a junction with some glowsticks that indicated we should turn right.  Tony mentioned earlier that all turns would be left but we went right anyway.  Within ½ mile we came upon about 8 headlamps coming our way.   They told us that the course marking had been tampered with and to turn around.  This group included the lead female who said she made it all the way back down to the freeway before turning around.   When we got back to the mismarked jct. one of the pacers corrected the glowsticks.

This section continues with a steady climb on up to Keecheless Ridge.  Most of the group we came across just kept running up this grade.  Tony and I walked and would break into a jog during the less steep parts.  Soon I was running more then Tony and gapped him again.  This was the last time I saw him.   As I made my way into Keecheless AS the lead female and her pacer were just leaving.  I had a bit of soup and grabbed some gels before taking off.  I was really happy with my new Nathan pack.  Refills went quick and seamless.  Within a few minutes I passed the lead girl at the top of a long 7 mile stretch of forest road downhill.  I guess they were taking a potty break because a few minutes later they went screaming past me even though I thought I was moving pretty fast.:roll:  The next 6 miles I was completely alone in the darkness. :cool: This section had very few course markings which made me believe that I had gotten off course a few times.

At around 12:30 a.m. I made my way into Lake Kachess AS about 30 minutes ahead of my 24hour schedule.  I was really excited about the next part which is sometimes called the "trail from hell":evil:.   This section follows the edge of a mountain for 5 miles along Lake Kachess.   At first you have to follow a barely visible trail down to the lake.  This trail is demarcated with glowsticks and it was sometimes necessary to stand up on a log or a stump to see the next glowstick.  If you are good with technical stuff like trail finding and log crawling then you can run this section as fast as the leaders.  I do well with this kind of trail.  Once on the trail you follow the edge of the lake but the trail is a good distance above the lake and a slip at the wrong time could easily end your race and possibly your life.  I could see the quarter moon light glaring on the water down below.

I passed 2 runners and their pacers during this section and caught up with the female leader and her pacer.:cool:  These runners were surprised to see someone moving so well without a pacer.  I'm not sure if I could do better with a pacer.  I don't think I could but I will have to try it some day.  I was hearing one of the pacers tell their runner everything like how to climb over a log and how to cross a creek.  I don't think I'd like that very much.  I'd rather do my own thinking.  Of course when things get really bad, which often happens at these things then having someone there to do your thinking would be a real godsend.   I guess I have mixed feelings.:wtf:

After 2 hours of very fun nighttime lake side running I followed the lead female into Mineral Creek AS at the 73 mile point.  I was feeling real good.  I had some more soup and another ensure.  I was really enjoying all the soup that I had during this run.  I'll have to remember that.  The next part was going to be another monster climb back up into the high, exposed country.  I wasn't cold but I decided to wrap a long sleeved shirt around my waist and I put a cap in my shorts pocket (along with all the used gel packs) just in case it got cold.  2 years ago it was just beginning to get light at this point.  This time I left the aid station about 2:40a.m. which was ½ hour faster then my 24 hour chart.:cool:

The climb up to No name ridge AS has very beautiful views if you are fortunate to be slow enough to see them in the light.:roll:  No such luck for me this time.  All I had to look at was the forest road in front of me and the pair of head lamps from some runners behind me.  The lead girl had already gone by and I wouldn't catch here again.  The headlamps behind me, however, gave me the motivation to run as much of this climb as I could.  The strategy worked.:cool:  I made it to the top of the ridge in good time and the runners behind never caught up.  At this aid station I saw my first casualty.:sad:  A runner was lying in a sleeping bag on a cot and was looking at me with this forlorn expression on his face.  As I was eating my raviolis without utensils all I could do was look at this guy and think how nice that must be to lay down in a nice warm sleeping bag waiting for a ride out.   It was weird but our eyes meant and we had this weird mental connection.  This was not the mental place I needed to be with 20 of some of the most difficult miles on the course left to run.
Parent - - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-26 4:11 PM
I decided to take a nodoz capsule here.   I refer to this pill as my pacer in a pocket. :mischief:  I also took 2 more ibuprofens with a personal vow to take no more.:meh:

I questioned the volunteer on how hard it was to navigate this ridge in the dark and she said it was difficult but marked, so stay alert.  If I got off course then I should make my way to the ridge.:wtf:

The next 6 miles or so are what is referred to as the "cardiac needles".  This section wouldn't be so bad on fresh legs but legs with 80 miles and over 19000 feet of climbing do reject the idea of forward motion thru this kind of terrain.:cry:  The needles are a never ending series of short but very steep climbs that follow the contour of the ridge up to the top of Thorpe Mountain.  I remember some real precarious drop offs on this section but thankfully it was pitch dark this time so I couldn't see them.

Will the needles did their job and pretty much zapped what was left of my legs.  I made it to the Thorpe AS which sits at the bottom of a ½ mile out and back to the lookout tower which is pretty much straight up.  While going up I saw about 4 runners coming down.  I was surprised to see that I was so close to this many.  When I arrived at the top the sun was just starting to crest over the distant peaks. :cool: Very beautiful but seeing the other runners gave me a bit of a charge so I grabbed a ticket from a bag and went back down to the AS.  The ticket was to prove that you made it to the top.  This aid station is great because these wonderful volunteers pack in everything (including water) from some distant trailhead.

My knees were finely starting to really hurt on the steep descents.   I believe there were several more agonizing needles after Thorpe but I can't remember how many.

From Thorpe it was about a 4 mile descent down to the French Cabin AS.  These guys could see you from way down the mountain and you could hear them proclaiming that a runner was approaching as you ran.   At French Cabin I took my first sit down break of the day and had some more soup.  I tell you, if it wasn't for that soup all day and night I'm not sure if I would have finished.  So feeling pretty good except for the knee pain on the downhill stuff I took off.  I was noticing at this point that whenever I stopped for even a few moments my legs would stiffen up and there would be pain until I got moving for a few minutes.  Better just to keep moving I guess. : pbbt:

I crested one more steep but short up onto this saddle then the next was some great meadow/wooded running on gradual down and through a number of creek crossings.  I was way past worrying about my feet getting wet so I just splashed through the crossings.  I kept looking at my watch and somehow thought that I had lost my chance at a sub 24 hour finish.  I was thinking a 25 hour would be great.  The one thing that experience has taught me is that it is nearly impossible for your mind to make accurate estimations when fatigue has set in this hard so I ignore my thoughts of a finish time and just decide to run as hard as I can.  Your head telling you that you can't make it, is your head telling you to quit running, just ignore it.:roll:  I still have 6 or 7 miles to go but there is a section of steep switchbacks coming up that has me worried.  In my mind these switch backs went on for a long, long time but I was surprised and happy to find that my memory was inaccurate and the steep part did not last long because soon I was bailing off the mountain and out into a clearing where the final aid station was.

I arrived at the Silver Creek AS with an elapsed time of 22 hours and 50 minutes which means I had 1 hour and 10 minutes to run (to break 24) what I was told was 4.8 miles of flat to get to the finish.  This sounds easy but after running for 95 miles I new it wouldn't take too much of a break down to eat up 1 hour real fast and still not be near the finish.:sad:  I decided to just run real slow and easy the whole way.  As I was leaving the AS my legs immediately cramped up which almost made me panic:shocker!: but I just walked a bit and then picked it up to a manageable jog.  For the next 4.8 miles I held this 10-10.5 mpm pace with grit and determination. :cool:  Along the frontage road I new that I looked silly with such and serious look on my face and such a slow pace.: pbbt:  I didn't care.  At some point I looked at my watch and new that I had sub 24 even if I crawled the rest of the way so I just decided to keep running because walking would have just prolonged the anticipation and pain. 

As I approached the fire station where the race started I could see my truck so I new my wife was there at least ½ hour before the earliest time I told her that I would arrive.  Apparently she had just arrived and was being told to move the truck when she saw me coming down the RR tracks.  The truck could wait.   As I ran by her she handed me the leash which held my smaller dog Pablo.  So Pablo crossed the finish line with me. :hug: http://share.shutterfly.com:80/action/welcome?sid=0AcMWrlw0YtWLDKg&emid=sharshar&linkid=link4
  My wife usually doesn't get very excited about my running but this time she was screaming happy which made my experience so much greater.  :hug:

I finished in 23 hours and 25 minutes in 9th place.  I think I this might qualify as a successful goal number 3.
Parent - - By jaszflamus (I like wool!) Date 2008-08-26 4:24 PM
wow joe, just wow:shocker!::grin::hug: Of course it culminated a "very good year of running" for you. No, fucking great year of running. And no, you knew what you were doing.

We knew you kicked ass, but your descriptions how you kicked ass are amazing! Incredible descriptions of what was going on both inside your head and outside. Shivers. I could go on as long as your report : pbbt: but won't. Except to add that you and the junkyard dog may be the best finishing pic I've ever seen anywhere.:cool:

Congratulations joe on so many levels, and thanks.:hug:
Parent - - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 10:22 AM
Thanks for the awesome reply Jasz.  Not many people do this sort of stuff but many seem interested.  I think it is important to get it down for others to read for interest , research or whatever.  I remember devouring S&F's reports not just because of his out of this world writing skills but I had a very deep interest in the subject matter. 

The gentleman that I was running with early in the race was from Penn. and was very much old school with a successful marathon background.  Did you happen to notice any one that you know on the finish list?
Parent - By jaszflamus (I like wool!) Date 2008-08-27 5:19 PM
I'm more than just interested joe. God and aging body willing, I hope to "be there" if not at your kind of level. Your descriptive skills, mindset, joy in the big and little things, ability to recall details, attention to those details, passion etc. inspire and educate all at once. More importantly than that though, I simply love hearing about how a running friend runs, whether in training or racing and whether it's good or not as good.:hug: Of course, you make it easier to love hearing the ups and downs when you kick ass.: pbbt:

I re-checked all the finishers and didn't recognize any names from these parts. The one listed PA peep finished more than 6 hours behind you, and I didn't recognize his name.
Parent - - By Yankeebelle Date 2008-08-26 4:37 PM
:hug:  Joe   :hug:

How are you feeling? 

Second-guessing being on course is tough.  It's happened to me after only 25 miles...:roll:...in daylight. :blush:
Vandalism is :mutmad:
You and your dog.  :hug:
Pacer in a pocket. :laugh:
Mrs Joerunner  :cool:
Cardiac needles  :shocker!:

3 goals met!  :grin:
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 10:25 AM
Thanks Dottie!:hug:

A note about that vandalism.  The rumor is that one of the volunteers (an ex Ranger) at an aid station  saw these vandals in action and had enough and put a fairly decisive and rapid stop to the situation.:laugh:
Parent - - By squirrelgirl (Indian Buffet Queen) Date 2008-08-26 6:10 PM
OM freakin' G!!!!!!
So inspirational!
If I can ever get past 8 miles again (:cry:) !!!!!
You are definitely a 100 mile stud. :hug:
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 10:26 AM
Thanks Squirrelly!:hug:

You will get past 8 miles I know you will!:happy:
Parent - - By LDR (100 Mile Stud) [us] Date 2008-08-26 6:29 PM
Astounding!!!! 

Congratulations on not only a great race, but a great 2008!!!  You've worked hard, worked smart, and earned the fantastic payback you've received for your effort!!!!!!

Good stuff!!!!!
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 10:28 AM
Thanks LDR!   2008 wasn't without mistakes but I think overall it was big year for me.  I'd really like to have another year like this one.  Wasn't a bad you for you either.:wink:
Parent - - By Blueberry Sky Date 2008-08-26 6:35 PM
:shocker!::shocker!:
You just keep getting more and more amazing, all the time. I LOVE your detailed reports and I thinks it's really awesome your wife's cheers mean so much to you.  HUGE congrats on this race, you truly are my hero. :hug::hug::hug:

Pablo rocks too. :grin::hug:
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 10:30 AM
You should of seen the hugs I got from pablo when I stopped.:laugh:  I think he actually had an idea of what was going on.:hug:

Hero?:blush:

Other then you guys here my wife is my only real support.   Oh yeah the dogs too.:laugh:
Parent - - By miniscraper Date 2008-08-26 6:36 PM
:shocker!::cool:
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 10:30 AM
:cool::cool:
Parent - - By jennifer7 (100 mile studette) [us] Date 2008-08-26 6:50 PM
way to go Pablo!!!  and you did pretty good too joe! ;) :x :x :x :D :D :D
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 10:31 AM
I tried to tell pablo to act tired so people would actually think he was finishing 100 miles but he was too excited so he just bounced up and down as we ran.:roll:

Thanks Jenn!:hug:
Parent - - By sideshowbob Date 2008-08-26 7:12 PM
Fantabulous JR --you are something. Thanks for sharing
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 10:32 AM
Your very welcome Bob and thank you!:happy:
Parent - - By roselanwa Date 2008-08-26 7:44 PM
wife:hug:
No Doz:laugh:
PEDRO ( I think that's your dog's name but I'm kinda drunk and lazy)
YOU ROCK!
Parent - - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 10:32 AM
Pedro is not my dogs name but now I wish it was.:laugh:

Thanks roselanwa!:hug:
Parent - By roselanwa Date 2008-08-27 12:08 PM
:laugh::laugh::blush:
I blame the wine.
Parent - By gottarungirl Date 2008-08-26 7:45 PM Edited 2008-08-26 7:56 PM
Grg's Response to Part III: pbbt:: pbbt:: pbbt:
:laugh::laugh:  I know, I'm a dork! :blush::laugh:

Keeping on moving :grin:, agonizing needles :cry:, splashing through crossings :grin::hug:, :grin: bailing off the mountain, Pablo :hug:,
:grin::hug: super cheering fabulous fantastic Mrs. Joerunner :grin::hug:,

Did you notice how Pablo is kicking up his heels as he crosses the finish line with you?  :roll: What a showoff!!  :laugh::laugh:: pbbt:

Closing thoughts from Babbling Brook aka Grg:wink:

It's completely mind boggling how you were able to complete this race, to have such clarity of thought after completing it (I can't remember half the details to my 1/2 marathons much less anything more), to be able to persevere and keep training when the darts of life come flying at you (yeah, you're SuperHuman but you still get the same stuff slung at ya like the rest of us do), ....

I'm in total awe!!  Congratulations, YOU ARE THE MAN!!!! 
Now get that Spy to bring the VW Bus and get the roadtrip started.  Don't forget the Mrs. and the doggies, Trinity, Sheeps, 5kBob, the rest of the west coast gang and :mischief::mischief::mischief:  make sure the gang kidnaps my birthday brother and get yourselves to the East Coast. :happy::hug::cool:
Parent - - By trailheadgirl [us] Date 2008-08-26 7:54 PM
Ya know, I'm always calling you my hero,
and maybe NOW you'll understand just
why.

I am in awe of you:blush:
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 10:33 AM
um um um :blush:

Thanks thg!:hug:
Parent - - By dangerousdan (bear terrorist) [us] Date 2008-08-26 8:48 PM
You amaze and inspire me.  I mean that!!!  Great report.  So NoDoz don't upset your tummy?
Parent - - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 10:38 AM
So were you able to empathize with your effort still fresh?

I don't think I mentioned it but my stomach problems came and went for pretty much the whole race.  I never threw up, I think it was mostly gas.:blush:  I didn't have any tummy problems with the nodoz that I know of.   The funny thing is that I have been off coffee for a month just so I could get a big bang during the race but I forgot to take it until 80 miles into the race.:laugh:

Thanks Danni and thank you for keeping my training fresh and motivated by sharing your training and achievement.:hug:
Parent - - By dangerousdan (bear terrorist) [us] Date 2008-08-27 11:20 AM
I can empathize for sure but I can't imagine being so fast and good.  But one of the things that motivates me is that I see you getting better and better and think "hey I will probably get better if I keep at this." 

I couldn't possibly go off coffee for a month.  Call me an addict but I can't.  Soundandfury gave me permission to drink coffee, and all I need is one enabler who says what I want him to say :p
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 1:20 PM
I still haven't decided if staying away from coffee helps or not.  I've decided that purging the caffeine from my blood stream every once in a while can't hurt so I'll continue on.: pbbt:

You will definitely get better if you keep at it.  3 years ago you couldn't finish 50 now you have completed 100.  I think I got a few good years left in me but you got the best  years ahead of you.:mischief:
Parent - - By old turtle Date 2008-08-26 9:15 PM
Ok - I skipped to the outcome 'cause I don't have time to read the whole thing now.  And all I can say is WOW!!!!  You are so much my hero!:hug:

EDIT:  Tomorrow I promise to read the whole thing.:hug:
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 10:39 AM
have you read it yet? huh?  huh? huh?:wtf:: pbbt:

Thanks OT!:hug:
Parent - - By Xtreme Taper Date 2008-08-27 6:59 AM
That was some adventure and what a great writeup. Felt like I was there. A lot of things you mentioned on the course sound difficult and scary, but the tunnel sounds the worst. Man, 2+ miles in a wet dank dark underground tunnel. :shocker!::cry: I'm not sure what else to say but it must have felt great to know you had that sub24 in the bag as you neared the finish. That seems like some accomplishment on the course you described (and that I peaked at).

Congrats on the great 100 and your most awesome year of running!

Oh, and there's still 4 months left this year you know... maybe since you are on such a roll you should go for goal #4! 
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 1:22 PM
Thanks XT!  And yes that tunnel was creepy.  I had to fight to keep from getting claustophobic.

Oh, and there's still 4 months left this year you know... maybe since you are on such a roll you should go for goal #4!   I actually do have a goal 4 coming up.  It wasn't  in my original plan but I'm still feeling in good shape so I'm going to go for it.
Parent - - By cowboyjunkie Date 2008-08-27 7:12 AM
It might sound like a well thought out plan but I really had no idea what I was doing. :laugh:

Stars never looked so good. :cool:

They told us that the course marking had been tampered with and to turn around. :mutmad:

As I was eating my raviolis without utensils :laugh:

I refer to this pill as my pacer in a pocket. :mischief:

I remember some real precarious drop offs on this section but thankfully it was pitch dark this time so I couldn't see them. :shocker!::cry:

The one thing that experience has taught me is that it is nearly impossible for your mind to make accurate estimations when fatigue has set in this hard so I ignore my thoughts of a finish time and just decide to run as hard as I can. :blush:

My wife usually doesn't get very excited about my running but this time she was screaming happy which made my experience so much greater. :hug:

WOWWOWWOW!! Great run Joe and such a wonderful, detailed report :happy:

Congratulations on a most awesome race and finish! :hug:

In some ways, we have had a similar year running-wise and i feel like your much slower, lower mileage twin :laugh:

love, love, love you joerunner :hug:
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 1:24 PM
:hug:Thanks so much CBJ!  I have enjoyed watching your progress so much this year and yes I agree that we are running twins.: pbbt:
Parent - - By Slow Mo (meanie) [us] Date 2008-08-27 7:30 AM
I remember some real precarious drop offs on this section but thankfully it was pitch dark this time so I couldn't see them.:laugh:

:happy: You are amazing!
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 1:25 PM
Thanks slow mo!:hug:  It was so much different doing these sections in the dark.  The last time I was way slower and actually saw stuff.
Parent - - By CTookey [us] Date 2008-08-27 9:13 AM
That was incredible!!!  You are the man!!
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 1:26 PM
Thanks Ctookey!  Miles for the 2's!: pbbt:
Parent - - By arepper Date 2008-08-27 10:57 AM
Joe,

what an amazing journey! Thanks for the report so that we can enjoy it with you! It seems your training races set you up nicely for this very special performance. Even though you said, you 'didn't know what you were doing', I am sure it paid you back nicely. Sometimes we can see things a lot more clearly looking backwards especially w.r.t. training. I am glad you shared that you did this.

My favorite line,

Along the frontage road I new that I looked silly with such and serious look on my face and such a slow pace.: pbbt:  I didn't care. 

Awesome! I bet you did look silly. : pbbt:  So what! HA! :laugh:

What a fantastic run and report. After savoring this one for a while, shoot me a line and tell me which races you are contemplating for next year. I am expecting to head out west for at least two runs in 2009!

Rest and recover well. :cool:
Parent - - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 1:27 PM
Thanks Angus but what is w.r.t. training?

Pm is in the mail.:cool:
Parent - By arepper Date 2008-08-27 2:04 PM
with respect to ...:happy:
Parent - - By IB [us] Date 2008-08-27 2:16 PM
Awesome race Joe & a great report!

I have worried a few times on some of the longer runs about course markers being tampered with. Sorry to hear you had to deal with that.
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 6:46 PM
Thanks troy.   I'm starting to get used to that stuff. I've seen it happen in 3 different races so far.
Parent - - By skoozey [us] Date 2008-08-28 2:00 PM
Wow Joe. That's really fantastic! I am again stunned by the course that is Cascade Crest. What an amazing sequence of terrain -- and to think that you accomplished it all in less than 24 hours. :cool: Your accomplishment is very inspiring. I repeatedly tell myself, "ultras? Never!" Then I hear about this kind of performance on this kind of course and think "Wow, That'd be Cool!"
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-09-06 9:44 PM
Oh it is way cool Skoozey.  If you ever get the opportunity you won't regret it.  Thanks so much for reading and the nice comments!:happy:
Parent - - By goodwine Date 2008-08-30 7:01 PM
Holy cow, great race!  That sucks about the losers tampering with the course markers, but makes your sub-24 race even that more impressive.  Great job!

The tunnel part of the course sounds especially cool, but keeping cool and not freaking out would be difficult in there with the fog and darkness.  Overall it seems like a really awesome race. :cool:
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-09-06 9:49 PM
Thanks goodwine.  That tunnel is so wierd but it does really make you focus on your running so you don't have to think about your surroundings.:mischief:   Ccc 100 is really gaining a reputation as a first class event.  Getting kind of tough to get into though.
Parent - - By tidy_b Date 2008-09-06 7:19 AM
Fantastic job!  Fantastic report!  You are the man!:cool::cool:

2222222222222222
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-09-06 9:49 PM
Thanks a lot Tidy!:happy:
Parent - By gottarungirl Date 2008-08-26 7:37 PM
Grg's Response to Part II: pbbt:: pbbt:

:roll::roll: >The next 15 or 16 miles were seemingly effortless.  :roll::roll: 
I wanna grow up and be like Joerunner too! :blush::cool:

>I gave my wife a kiss and told her to think about a best case scenario and a 24 hour finish even though I really didn't think this was possible.


:hug::hug::grin::grin::cool:

>I could see the quarter moon light glaring on the water down below.


:hug::cool:
Parent - - By Trinity (Troublemaker) Date 2008-08-26 6:58 PM
congrats joe:hug:!  i am so so so proud of you.  what a huge year you've had and it's still not over:grin:  great report as usual and i can't believe how much you remember!

ok sos a few questions:
-what kind of soup were you eating?
-how long do you guys usually stay at each aid station?  i'm really curious because i'm sure that factors a lot in your goal finish time
-did you have hallucinations this time around?
-are you still thinking of that next race in a couple of weeks?:wink::laugh:

and what a great finish photo with pablo:hug:  didn't rudy get jealous: pbbt:  and kudos to your wife too for being there to support you and stuff:hug:

great job!!!  your accomplishment's truly mind-boggling:hug:
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 10:14 AM
Thanks Trin:hug:!

I had tomato, potato, chicken noodle and something else that I couldn't identify.:roll:

I didn't spend much time at the aid.  I think I was out in under 3 usually and maybe 4 or 5 minutes at my drop bag locations.  So there were 15 aid stations times maybe 3 minutes that would make 45 minutes altogether.  :mutmad:I could have broken 23 hours without aid.:roll:

I had some little bitty visions but nothing serious like plain last year.  My head really stayed in it this time.  I think it helped that I sleep really well the night before.

-are you still thinking of that next race in a couple of weeks?:evil::mischief::wink:

Rudy is on probation for stepping on my toes.:mutmad:
Parent - - By gottarungirl Date 2008-08-26 7:29 PM
Grg's Response to Part I : pbbt:

Cascade Crest 100 is as the name implies 100 miles of running, walking, scampering, splashing, climbing and sometimes falling through some beautiful country in the Cascade Mountains east of Seattle Washington.  :grin::happy::hug::grin::happy::hug:The race starts at 10 a.m. which seems kind of late to me but I guess they want everyone to experience some of the more technical parts of the trail during the dark hours.:shocker!::shocker!::scared: The website says there are 20000 + feet of elevation gain :shocker!::shocker!:and about 75% single :cry:track.

>Another monster 2000' climb up forest roads to Keechelus Ridge followed by a 7 mile  drop back down to Lake Kachess which is the gateway to the famed "trail from hell" section-a 5 mile section of gruesome trail that takes every body forever to finish if they finish at all.  This section has all the features that put the word technical in some trails including steep cliff like drops into some dark abyss, old growth 5' diameter trees lying across the trail with no way around, mud, water, disappearing sections etc....


Are you sure Ron Horn wasn't the RD for this race? :wink:

>At this point my legs started to really get sore. At this point? How about the 3300' climb in the first 8 miles? :shocker!::wtf:

Parent - - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 10:18 AM
Aw grgy, you always make me feel like I'm something more then I really am. :hug: Not that I'm complaining mind you.:wink:
Believe it  or not there are about 6 or 7(maybe more) state side races that are considered more difficult (slower) then CC.  One of them is over there by you and is called massnutten.

Thanks for your series of responses!!!!:hug:
Parent - - By gottarungirl Date 2008-08-27 9:04 PM
:mischief:  So you're going to run the Massnutten?  :mischief:
Remember Spy is in PA now.  You could be one of the first 5 people he's ever FEd with.  That spot won't be lasting too long now. :cool:

Oh as the self-appointed VP of the Joerunner Fan Club, I think I need develop my responses a little more.  I can't have anyone taking my position. :wink::hug::cool:
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-09-01 5:24 PM
:laugh:I would love to meet  spy.  I just don't think I'd do  so well on all those rocks.:sad:
Parent - - By huenix [us] Date 2008-08-27 10:41 AM
Wow... Most awesome race! Congratulations on 9th overall.
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 6:47 PM
Thanks a bunch huenix!:happy:
Parent - - By ANklebiter [us] Date 2008-08-27 2:31 PM
You ROCKED the CC. Congrats on accomplishing your three goals (A hat trick).
Parent - - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-27 6:48 PM
Thanks Anklebiter and good luck with your 2 goals.:happy:
Parent - By ANklebiter [us] Date 2008-08-28 5:07 AM
I think I need to revise thoughs two goals:sad:.
Parent - - By noskillz (Techus Dorkus Maximus) Date 2008-08-27 9:50 PM
you da man joe...  

how about a taco :happy:
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-28 6:52 AM
:laugh:I think you me and little mary are the only ones to get that reply.
Parent - - By Rio Date 2008-08-29 11:14 PM
Hope you're not sick of reading praises and all that good stuff, because I'm a little late to the party.  That tunnel, and the "cardiac needles", and those dropoffs that you couldn't see, and 100 miles in less than 24 hours and ninth place, and finishing with your dog . . . .  :cool:  What an amazing accomplishment!  Your hard work has really paid off. 

Thanks for the great report.
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-30 9:37 AM
Thank you much Rio!  "Hope you're not sick of reading praises and all that good stuff"  Never!:)
Parent - - By shiznitz [us] Date 2008-08-30 8:12 AM
you're awesome... your running and your memory.

nicely done...the whole year was great for you.:hug:

i hope to be there next year:hug:.
Parent - - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-08-30 9:38 AM
2009 is going to be shiznitz's year I know it!:hug:

Thanks shiz!:hug:
Parent - By shiznitz [us] Date 2008-08-30 11:54 AM
lets hope!!!!!:hug:
Parent - - By indie [us] Date 2008-08-31 11:46 AM
Wow Joe. What an impressive job. I've always admired the focus with with you chase your goals and then achieve them.

Loved the report. Pacer in a pocket. :laugh: I am impressed at the no caffeine for 4 days thing, I'd go nuts, but speaks well for your determination. That is a lot of ibuprofen though. :wink: 

Congratulations!
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-09-01 5:23 PM
Actually it was no caffeine for 4 weeks.  I have mixed feelings about the ibuprofen.  I  really try not to go overboard.  The main thing is to plan ahead and drink lots of water before you take them which is what I did.  I was thinking that I was taking 800 mg each time but I was wrong it was 400 so I took 1200 total.

Thanks for reading Indie!:happy:
Parent - - By echoguy [us] Date 2008-09-01 3:54 PM
I think I this might qualify as a successful goal number 3.

I would say so:cool:

I saved this for labor day when I had some extra time to savor it. I am so glad that I did.

I am intrigued by your thoughts on a pacer. As you know, I had pacers for my 100 miler last year and ran as a pacer this year. After it was over, I thought to myself that it might be even more of an experience to be out there alone for those "interesting" miles. Hmmmm. I do like the thought that if I got into trouble that I wouldn't need to rely on other runners who are possibly at the edge of their ability as well. It would be best if I could just shine my flashlight into the air with the bat symbol on it and have Batman appear when I need him. Anyway, I think that you can be particularly satisfied with your ability to go it alone on these long runs.

Recover well, and have fun with the next one.
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-09-01 5:19 PM
Thanks echoguy!

I don't have much experience running with a  pacer  so I can't really compare.  My thought is that if you are well rested going into the race and everything goes right during the race then a pacer probably wouldn't help much.  When I ran Plain last year  I completely disentigrated during the night.  There is no doubt in my mind that a good pacer would have knocked 1-2 hours off my time if they were allowed.  When I do Western I plan on having a pacer because I will be going for the fastest time possible and I think a pacer might help.

My problem with partnering up is that talking takes away from my concentration and when I'm not concentrating on running then my effort goes up and/or I slow down.  

I do think there is a certain amount of pride and an  extra  feeling of accomplishment by going alone.
Parent - - By financeguy Date 2008-09-01 6:08 PM
Amazing, awesome, not enough superlatives to describe your race.  You inspire all of us in different ways, but ultimately with the same theme.  You make the impossible seem possible.:cool:

I know that this may be my last year on pavement, from reading your previous exploits, I think the answer for me may be in the dirt.:grin:
Parent - By joerunner (100 mile stud) Date 2008-09-06 9:54 PM
Thanks fg!  It may seem impossible and overly daunting but to tell you the truth anybody on these boards could do it if they really wanted to.  I think it is the "want to" part that most people don't have.  Watch out if that trail ultra bug bites you.  I had so much fun earlier in the year training for that marathon that I think I'll continue to keep part of my sights on the road stuff as well as the trails.  I just really love it all.
Up Topic Training / Trail and Ultra Running / Cascade Crest 100 2008 version

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